Good Tape: Notes from The Podcast School

Whether leaning over our computers with Jackie helping us record and replay our own voices, or listening to the podcasts James chose for us to analyze, the reason we have come back to the human voice for our storytelling was immediately clear. It was the attraction of attention, of being in the moment.

Jane Cooper, Poet & Teacher

Jane Cooper, poet and teacher, marked the lives of many poets and instilled an intense care for the making of poems in all of us.

Wild

Cheryl Strayed was one of the biggest names appearing at the conference. She was going to be sitting on a few panels and also be part of a group doing a reading and discussion. I assumed many people there would be wanting to meet her. I also assumed nobody there would want to meet her more than I did.

What Galvanizes You as a Writer?

Once upon a time, before I’d ever been published, I read a column in Vogue magazine that galvanized me as a writer. I was then 22, newly emerged from an adolescence that this article nailed.

Knifecorp

High School senior, Wally Banks is selling knives door to door, and gets trapped in a man’s house with a dark secret and must escape before it’s too late.

Exquisite Corpse Published!

MFAW-WA alumna Tawnya Renelle’s Goddard thesis, The Exquisite Corpse, is being published this month by an independent press in Glasgow, Scotland.

Kyle Bass in the News

Kyle Bass

Everybody’s Writing Crisis

My recent writing life has been one extended dry spell, though I wouldn’t say I’m literally not writing. I’m plugging away at my novel in progress. The real problem is that I seem to have lost my nerve when it comes to finishing.

Waves

When I think about the skills I have acquired as a playwright in the world, I am amazed at how well they serve me when asked to be articulate about something for a greater purpose than to be produced or published. I can revise on my feet in the moment; I can collaborate with people who don’t have the back story; I can build a narrative.

Healing/Heeling

“Merging the mechanics of dog handling courses with the intensely personal story of how relationships with dogs have shaped hir life, Sassafras Lowrey has created a new kind of memoir, both deeply engaging and emotionally devastating.

Flash House Goes Digital!

Dear All,

The digital edition of MFAW-WA faculty member Aimee Liu’s novel Flash House is now available for pre-order here: https://amzn.to/2GIltdD
The official release date is May 1.

Congratulations, Aimee!

Mapping the Novel

Early this month I printed out the 300 pages of my novel draft and laid them out in a snaking pattern, chapter by chapter, around my house. With my husband away at a theater fellowship, there was no one around to complain about the commandeering of every room. For the next two weeks I wandered about in the story at random, revising out of sequence, getting to know the layout. Most pages were on the floor, and it added some stretching and yoga to my writing day to get down close enough to see the words. By the end of it I could visualize a map of it from start to finish as easily as I can of the county in Tennessee where I grew up.

Goddard MFAW AWP Panels!

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Panic at Trancisco

The best part of beginning again after so much ending again is that my own rate of revelations happen much faster. I have a map. I made it myself with Goddard experts who enthusiastically shared their compasses. I think back to my first semester and the time I spent muzzling Majesty Wells inside a bloodstained trunk while I looked for my keys. This is better. There are clean restrooms ahead and Orson is just another passenger dozing under pulsing streetlamps.

Subtext and Text

We confronted the building and came away proud by re-learning what makes a scar and what can provide healing – adventure with a friend to defy the norm, create ritual and witness.

CWC&R Registration is Open!

CWC&R Registration is Open!

AWP 2019 in Portland, OR!

AWP 2019 Goddard College Panel line-up!

Craftsman Tools, Auschwitz, Siddhartha

I love this word, woke. Technically, I guess you could say it’s a verb in the past tense, as in “I woke up and saw the light,” but recently it’s been used as an adjective to inform the present, as in “I am woke to the reasons my people came to this country and I am not proud of it anymore!” But when I think about craft, and what it means to me, which is pretty much everything—it’s a doctrine and a commitment, it’s a mantra and a fail-safe, it’s better than a cocktail or a joint or a church service—I must start with this old word newly used, this word “woke.” Because most of all, I think that craft is about being awake.

Modest Proposals

In the nonfiction publishing world, proposals are supposed to be the acorns, watered by a generous advance, from which mighty oaks will grow.

What POV Points To

The novel’s scintillating hilarity can be traced back to that gap between the narrator’s awareness and the character’s.

7 Reasons to go to Literary Conferences

When I decided to “become” a “real writer,” the best advice I received was from prolific children’s author Bruce Coville. He said, “You should join the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.” So I did. I went to their conference that summer—they hold a big one in Los Angeles every year for all levels, and a more professionally-oriented one in New York in the winter. I was a newcomer and the LA event was walking distance from my house, so how could I refuse?

High Five

I already did cancer as a child and had the t-shirt to prove it.

YOGA ON THE SHORE

The above is a side note — a digression — because what I really want to discuss is how artists can use their art to invent a place that has long existed. Last night Netflix aired Springsteen on Broadway. This is what Springsteen had to say about the Jersey Shore. Before I quote The Boss let me warn you that there are expletives so please move on if you are uncomfortable…

Conditions of Travel

Identity, fragile, gives way to identity…

Jean Valentine and Adrienne Rich: Crossing Generations

Poland Springs, Maine’s infamous water, sold worldwide, brings nothing to the town of Poland Springs, except the threat of poison. The springs ran dry fifty years ago, and the remaining Maine sources are close to human waste dumps, landfill, fish hatchery or toxic petroleum dump sites. It all matters, and back at my house, a little after 6pm, I meet with young poet filmmaker Matt to talk poetry.

The Shame of Losing

Today my first book is “officially” released unto the world. The Shame of Losing was picked up by Red
Hen Press fall of 2015, so here I am, three years later, wondering how to be a book marketer meanwhile
not choke on my own self-promotional worry tears.

The Word I Couldn’t Leave

I didn’t know how obsessed I was with the world – with the actual word world – until I went through my last book of poems and saw that I used the word at least 30 times.  Actually, another poet told me I used it 30 times but of course I went back and counted the words myself (because they were my words) to see if this was true.  I’d never done anything like that – count how many times a word got used.  I wonder if other poets do this?

Imaginative Literature in Dark Times

I was a child in Los Angeles adrift in a world of TV and spectacle and vapidity and a deep unarticulated loneliness and out-of-placeness, where I  learned and loved to read and found in literature the wild connections, understanding, and a chorus of voices which spoke to me then across time, space, culture and language, and encouraged and emboldened me, and continue to do so until today.

I was a child in Los Angeles adrift in a world of TV and spectacle and vapidity and a deep unarticulated loneliness and out-of-placeness, where I  learned and loved to read and found in literature the wild connections, understanding, and a chorus of voices which spoke to me then across time, space, culture and language, and encouraged and emboldened me, and continue to do so until today.

Learning to Write Without Writing

I either learned or re-learned these things about dramatic writing without writing:  Action is King.  Conflict is King #1-A. 

Writer’s Diary:  St. George’s Fields, London

Here I am again enjoying  my five-month writer’s colony, tenants covering the mortgage and the cat back home, 5000 miles away from all the other mundane cares.  One of the great paradoxes of our troubled times is that it’s cheaper for me to live in London than in the San Francisco Bay Area. This stripped-down life allows me to focus hard on my writing and enjoy the pleasures of a great city in my time off. My mental engine is madly racing. It’s exciting and exhausting at the same time. 

Save the Dates!

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Diary of Books

I’ve never kept a diary. At least not since I was eight, when my father bought two blank journals and suggested that he and I spend time together every evening writing in our diaries. For several weeks we did just that, sitting side by side on the living room couch and recording the events of the day. One day I came home from school and found my diary in the wrong place on the bookshelf. When I inquired about this, my dad said, “I have to admit something to you. I was so curious about what you’ve been writing that I couldn’t help myself, so I went in your room and read it.”

Books Eat Books

Books eat other books just as surely as hamsters eat their young.  A friend of mine who raises pigs once told me a pig has to eat three pounds of feed for every single pound of meat it produces. 

On Disability and Diversity: The Exclusivity of Inclusion

…disability is too often excluded in discussions of diversity, a good deal of which, for good reason, focuses on race. This silence is especially noteworthy because disability crosses racial, gender, sexuality, class, and national boundaries.

Emails to a Young Writer, or I Am Not Friedrich Nietzsche:

On Writers, Writer’s Block, Generosity, Creativity and Community

CLOCKHOUSE Excerpts

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Why This Blog Is Late

I just started rehearsals for a ten-day workshop a relatively new play of mine: BORN IN EAST BERLIN. The workshop is at TheatreWorks in Palo Alto. I decided to blog the first day.

The Sugar Balloon

Whenever you bump up against a writing situation that feels impossible, remember the Sugar Balloon, and all the experimentation, tenacity, innovation, determination, and risk that it took to arrive at this floating answer to a once-thought-impossible question.

Notebook

The paragraph or so of writing in preparation for this post I began on an empty page of an old, located notebook, one that flips vertically like a police ticket or meter maid book, but unlike law enforcement trappings

Claribel Alegría: A Poetry Pendant

By chance or design, I held the words of the Salvadoran poet Claribel Alegría, later translated by poet Carolyn Forche and published by Pittsburgh in Flowers from the Volcano.

Michael Klein, Goddard College 2018

But beauty is still important, isn’t it?  It seems to me and other fairly intelligent people in America, that we are living in a time when the failure to describe the time we are living in is truly mystifying.  So, please bear with me—I will get to today’s reason for all of us being here, but I don’t know what to say to you today that somehow hasn’t come out of outrage and disbelief—outrage and disbelief at the fact that one of the last bastions of seemingly liberal thought—the fourth estate—has normalized an aberration. 

Writing By the Seat of Your Pants

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about thrillers. About why recently I’ve been reading them compulsively at all hours of the day and night. Maybe the subject for a new book? I’m thinking about that. In the meantime I devour them at a great rate.

Between Yearning and Dread

Because Yearning and Dread is the theme of our upcoming Goddard residency, I’ve been thinking lately about the role these emotions play in my own writing, and as I look back over my fiction, particularly my novels, it seems pretty clear that the yearning and dread that fuel my work revolve around my parents.

In the Contemplative Realms

Here in the contemplative realms of the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon, I’ve lost track of time. I wander among timepieces and pendulums, spheres that chart the stars, and Earth globes with halos of hours at their poles, each artifact a survivor from its Renaissance birth through the firebombing of Dresden in World War II. Having lain undisturbed during the Iron Curtain years, these relics have arrived intact at the Age of Digitalia…

On Mastery

2018 marks two milestones in my life.

This past March, I turned 40, which everyone assures me is the new 30.  (It’s also, unsurprisingly, the old 60, but no one wants to talk about that.)  To celebrate my fortieth birthday, my husband attempted to coerce me into having a celebration worthy of the occasion, a lavish gathering of family and friends and colleagues, crammed into a modestly priced rental hall to eat finger foods we didn’t cook set to music we only vaguely remembered selecting.  I refused.  Does anybody really need to see me drunk and dancing awkwardly to another Macklemore song about inclusion?  I don’t think so.

A Farewell

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Wanderer in the Dark (an excerpt)

Wanderer was one of the last documented ships to carry an illegal cargo of slaves from Africa to the United States, landing at Jekyll Island, Georgia on November 28, 1858, arriving with some 400 slaves who survived the voyage from Angola.

Deadlines

One of the many reasons I envy Goddard students is that they have deadlines.

On Writing, Politics, and the Tarot

What do writing, politics and the Tarot have in common? On November 7th, 2017, I was elected Town Supervisor of Pine Plains, New York.

Notes from the Future by Deborah Brevoort

Get out your pens!  Head for the future by writing big!

My Mom Died and All I Got Was a Wet T-Shirt

My mom died three years ago and long before then, I knew I’d be writing about how it would all go down. Somehow, so did she. I was barely a teen, when after a particularly disturbing episode in our family’s constant chaos, my mother jerked my elbow towards her oversized chest and through her teeth spat, “Don’t you EVER write about this!!”

these words can’t wait for spell check

Sassafras Lowrey: these words can’t wait for spell check

(Word Count: 478)

Lust & Fun

Goddard College MFAW alum John Schmidtke:

“Okay,” I said. “But just in case, what’s the residency’s theme?”

“Lust and fun,” Elena said. 

My foot came off the gas a bit.

“Lust and fun?”  I asked.

 

“Yes,” Elena said.

Let me pause right here to confess that while I attended Goddard, lust took over my life.

I cheated on my wife Mary almost every night for two years.

CWC&R Registration is Open!

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My Smarter Wiser Super-Sexy Personal Echo

Though the newest version of the Echo is decent, you can get a better response to life if you use your own voice—i.e. the Personal Echo. The Personal Echo is in high demand because it offers the gift of someone else controlling your life, but doing it in a way that feels as if you are talking to yourself. And truly, what writer wouldn’t want that?

A Horse Named Kansas

I was welcome to stay at her house as long as I wanted, but had to come with her out to the ranch to meet and feed her horse, Kansas.

To Blog or Not To Blog

To blog or not to blog–that is the question, writers. Whether it is nobler to essay than to blog is a serious matter, and not everyone can do it or do it well.Because to do it well, one must face the truth of blogging and accept it: it’s a genre. It has rules. It requires… attention to craft.

Toiling in the Labyrinth: On Reading Literature Critically

My purpose for reading literature critically rests on two sloping planes. On the first plane is pleasure—experiencing the epiphany of understanding, a resolution to my inquiring mind. In other words, the Aha! moment. It’s the immediate gratification of critical thinking, which may be a purpose in of itself. However, beneath that first pleasurable plane, for me, is the second, more self-reflective plane.

On Language, On Sophisticated Style

I am an unabashed Language Freak. Word Freak. Sentence Freak. Grammar and Punctuation Freak. I am deeply in love with what William Golding called “that massive instrument” the English language. For me putting words down on paper is like playing a finely tuned piano. No wrong notes, please! My instrument is too precious to misuse.

Two Questions

A writer’s most valuable tools are not the pen or keyboard but rather her ability to listen, to pay attention to things, and to know the right questions to ask.  

Embracing the Personal

“It all just feels so… personal.”

N is a new student of mine, one who has worked in the theater industry for years, but never written a play before.  He called me before our first week of class, and I could tell he was feeling intimidated by the process of playwriting.  We discussed some exercises he could do and some of his favorite plays and playwrights, and I think I assuaged the majority of his concerns.  His one lingering reservation:

“It’s just so personal.”

From Fear to Yearning to Write Fiction Now

“Fiction is the art form of human yearning.” – Robert Olen Butler
“We are living in the most fearmongering time in human history.” – Barry Glassner
“I think what we need to do is to remind people that the Earth is a very dangerous place these days. That ISIS is trying to do us harm. And that the president’s commitment is to keep the country safe.” – Sean Spicer

A Holiday Potluck of Literature

Welcome to a table piled with a potluck of literature. If you think about it, all writers and readers are connected by our own ancient internet of literature.

What Is Writing For?

What is writing for?
 
I confess that, after having taught creative writing for more than 35 years and read tons of student writing I don’t remember and tons of good and great books by good and great authors I also don’t remember, I sometimes find myself wondering if we really need any more new writing.

Amtrak Writer’s Residency: Rail Tale

I’m writing to you today from the Amtrak quiet car, on a southbound train somewhere in New Jersey. Although the Amtrak Writer’s Residency Program is “currently evaluating the future of the program and do not have a timeline for when the next submission process will launch,” you can still pay out of pocket for a DIY Amtrak residency. That’s what I’ve been doing in 2017, now that my full-time teaching job is in Virginia and my fiancé is a theater director in New York.

The Indoor Secret Movie Voice

As soon as

you find your voice, you’ve lost it

On Deadline and On Holiday

On deadline and on holiday?  How is a writer to cope?

On Deadline and On Holiday

On deadline and on holiday?  How is a writer to cope?

Thanksgiving is here and my desk, which is usually covered with story notes and research books is now also covered with cookbooks and shopping lists.  My laptop windows range from comic book scripts to “how to cook a turkey in 45 minutes” articles.  Needless to say, it is a confusing time for a writer.  When you are on deadline and on holiday, how is a writer to cope?

The Fries Test: On Disability Representation

Twenty years ago, I edited Staring Back: The Disability Experience from the Inside Out, the first commercially published multi-genre anthology of writers with disabilities writing about disability. The anthology was published by Plume. In the introduction, I wrote: “Throughout history, people with disabilities have been stared out. Now, here in these pages — in literature of inventive form, at times harrowingly funny, at times provocatively wise — writers with disabilities affirm our lives by putting the world on notice that we are staring back.”

FIVE STORIES OF THE BODY: Anecdotes of Academia, Sexual Harassment and Abuse

I walked away and sat trembling on the back step of an abandoned building on campus, embarrassed.  Later, at home, still thinking about it and unable to shake the feeling of being somehow exposed to view, I made myself a cup of tea and ate a slice of buttered toast…

Unpacking the Passed

A college professor of mine, the indomitable Beth McCoy at Geneseo, liked to use the word “unpack.”

“Unpack that statement for us,” she’d say in class, meaning, Give us the meat. Tell us how you got there, what it means.

Call and Response

The entire play is built on this invisible structure of call and response.  The call is the spoken word. The response is flesh.  The word made flesh.  It is tied to the Yoruban concept of Nommo, which loosely translated means: “speaking makes it so.”  Nommo is also a Dogon word from Mali that refers to the power of words to create reality and build community.  You will also find this idea in the book of Genesis.

packing up my summer book: 20 lines

There is a stack of summer books on the floor still to return to the library, that have reached their renewal limit, overdue.

Repetition Exercise

REPETITION EXERCISE

I was at a Springsteen concert recently. One of his most famous songs — Hungry Heart — usually leads to him falling back onto the audience.

Bring in a Friend of Goddard

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Question Authority

The link between a sense of purpose, the military, absent fathers, religious fundamentalism, and even prison, seems to me to be a sort of human need for authority…

Save the Dates!

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Ohio, The Election, 2004, The ReMix: How I Came Looking

The ReMix begins: 2004 draft cuts: (in parens)– 2017 adds: IN CAPS:

After the election, I saw and felt a frozenness–I NEEDED (wanted) poetry (to arrive and speak to me–) to convert (a tableau of different shades of) dread to (a weave of) courage and CUT A PATH TO transformation. TO ROAR. I wanted something to take AND SPEAK the pain, (naturally).  And poetry can hold IT (every complex yearning).

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I Don’t Know Where to Begin…

“I don’t know where to begin because I have nothing to say…”

is the opening line from an essay by the poet, Mary Reufle, called “Madness, Rack, and Honey” which meditates, among other things, on metaphors, an ad for a Coach bag, the correlation between suicide and literacy, and wasting time. It’s a good read.

Letter from London: Reflections on Writers’ Reputations, Graves, Love Affairs, Accents, and a Murder, in No Particular Order

Moving back to London requires minimal adjustment, it’s as easy (as a writer once said about revision, compared to first draft composing) as sliding into a bath of warm oatmeal. No culture shock save for the first instant of wondering why dogs and babies are driving cars; all you have to do is exercise a little preliminary caution crossing the street and you’re done. Or maybe some mild culture shock, over here in the Land of Other People’s Problems, to learn exactly what the tabloid media judges important. “Horror on No. 77!” shrieks the top headline in the Evening Standard, the free newspaper everyone reads on the Tube going home after work.

After Trump After Charlottesville

This week, following the U.S. President’s pro-white nationalist tantrum before the press in the wake of the Charlottesville terrorist attack (remarkably deemed as such by Attorney General Jeff Sessions), it seems that we are witnessing a regression of a whole different order of magnitude.

How Are You, My Fellow Writer?

How are you, my fellow writer? This past spring, at my annual physical exam, I was given a questionnaire I was to fill and hand to the nurse before proceeding to the doctor’s office. I have been with the same practitioners since 2009, and this was the first time they asked about my emotional well-being.

On Survival: Dear John McCain

Dear John McCain:

I think of your tap code late at night when I am lonely. You broken and spent in the Hanoi Hilton tapping out “Are you okay?” to the guy on the other side of the wall.

“My name is Ernie Brace,” the taps from the prison cell next to you kept declaring. “My name is Ernie Brace.”  “My name is Ernie Brace.”  Then sobs.  Ernie Brace so overwhelmed by human contact he could only tap his name. 

CLOCKHOUSE Is Here!

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Literary Traveler

Last night around a campfire, I bonded with our Bedouin guide (عبت) over Arabian Sands. He said the book, which he re-reads often, captures Bedouin culture like a zoom lens (his words) and the changing culture of Arabia like a crystal ball (mine). Thesiger wasn’t the first explorer to cross the Empty Quarter, but he has become arguably the most famous. And he opened up this place for me. Last night I danced in a dishdasha, drank fresh milk from goats, and watched the sunset from towering dunes of powder-like sand.

Borderlands

I’ve got a lot to gain by leaving my own borders every now and then. So maybe it’s time for me to read something other than plays. Time to step out of my zone and experience different things for a while. As I’m putting together my summer reading list, I’m going to select some good novels, some collections of short stories and yes, some poetry. And for Diana, a memoir or two.

What’s Wrong with This Photograph?

Goddard College MFAW faculty member Kenny Fries: The editor wanted to crop the photograph so it only showed, close-up, the lower portion of the photograph, which showed my cane and shoes. Next to it would be a similarly cropped version of a photo of South African Olympic runner Oscar Pistorius, taken long before his trial for murdering his girlfriend.

Name, Rank, Serial Number: Poet

Casey worked as a journalist in the Marines until, in the late l970’s, she attended a writing conference in California where one of the faculty told her she should, be writing poetry instead.  Casey took this person and their work and when she returned to base, declared herself resident poet, meaning she would no longer report to duty.

I gave my name

rank an serial number,

said I was a poet.  Beyond

       that I refused to speak. 

Rather than send her to the brig for going AWOL, Casey’s superior officers sent her to the psych ward.  Part of her time in the psych ward is a subject of this book. 

By Way of the Author’s Voice

I wanted to open the valise of what could not make the trip into English. I wanted to hear Cortázar’s voice, the author speaking the language in which he wrote.

The Word World

I didn’t know how obsessed I was with the world – with the actual word “world” – until I went through my second book of poems and saw that I used the word at least 30 times. Actually, another poet told me I used it 30 times but of course I went back and counted the words myself (because they were my words) to see if this was true. I’d never done anything like that – count how many times a word got used. I wonder if other poets do this?

Forgotten Kingdoms at Rorshach Theatre

“Forgotten Kingdoms” touches on such themes as culture clash, the legacy of colonialism and competition among religions, but it is far from an issue play. Bold, often poignant and sometimes too leisurely, the work extends an appealingly personal and idiosyncratic vision, rich in telling detail. The title may reference forgetting, but the play often seems as clear and specific as a total-recall memory.

Writing the Other Side of the Story:  Researching the Pacific War in Japan

I have an irrational fear of falling into a Japanese toilet—not an everyday worry, but one that poses itself as I pack for a weeklong research trip to a small town in Japan. I had knee surgery a few years ago and my squat technique is not what it used to be. My friend Reiko tells me it’s highly unlikely. I don’t tell her that I am the Queen of Unlikely. I tell her she’s right, and prepare for the worst.

Tips for the Resistance Fatigued

If you are like me, you’ve probably spent hours over the last few months writing letters and making phone calls to your Senators and Congressman to voice your opposition to the political firestorm taking place in Washington DC. If you are like me, you are also probably experiencing some Resistance Fatigue, and frustration, due to busy signals, message machines that are full, staffers who are tired of hearing your voice, or hand cramps from writing so many letters.

Alumni Weekend Residency in October!

The Goddard College alumni planning committee invites you to an alumni-directed residency weekend to create emergent spaces to:

Gather, share and create in community,
Co-develop the Goddard College alumni association,
Foster personal/professional growth,
Organize opportunities to rise together and create a world that is socially and ecologically just,
Become a voice in the alumni community and be part of shaping Goddard’s future,
Cultivate and strengthen networks within the Goddard community, and
Actualizing the infinite possibilities of our collective identities.

Writing and Running

MFAW faculty Keenan Norris: …my father, was less a reader than a storage chest of historical anecdote and information, come upon by means academic and experiential. He was also a runner, my father, a collegiate national record holder for twenty four hours at one point in time, so while my writings are much less the result of natural talent than dedicated labor, the running is in my blood.

No Talking

Goddard MFAW faculty Rogelio Martinez: The play was now a straight arrow. I had talked the play right out of me.

The Strange Stories of Robert Aickman

Goddard MFAW faculty Susan Kim: My psychic reserves are low. And so I find myself reading the so-called “strange stories” of Robert Aickman.

Pay Attention

Pay attention: how many times I have written in the margins of a student’s work: what is the purpose here? What is your reason for writing this? Where does this connect to the human spirit, to the human experience? To you? To your readers?

As I write these words I am hurtling through a tunnel

Goddard MFAW alumna Theresa Barker: As I write these words I am hurtling (hurtling!) through a tunnel below ground under the hills of Seattle, in a plastic and metal carriage in a chamber that a thousand thousand thousand inventions of humans have created. Such a thing is unthinkable if you really pay attention to it, as unthinkable as time travel, yet here I am.

Language of Risk and Revelation

Goddard MFAW faculty Beatrix Gates: Turning to write about risk and its accompanying later knowledge, revelation, I fell into memories of the waves out from 9/11. Soon I was wearing a different set of shoes and walking in a different time.

Imaginative Literature

Goddard College MFAW faculty Micheline Aharonian-Marcom: Like you, I’m a devotee of letters and the Imagination, of Imaginative Literature, and what I have to offer you, writers, poets, dreamers, storytellers, keepers and people of the Word, in addition to my steadfast belief in the human capacity for love, are some thoughts on books and writing and art, for in my loss of what say to you, and in my great worries about the times we live in, no doubt many years in the making but now firmly upon us as we face the consequences of our creations and of our politics, I returned over the last months to the library to seek in solitude and quiet the wisdom, the beauty, the truth and company in books—my great home since I was a child in Los Angeles adrift in a world of TV and spectacle and vapidity and a deep unarticulated loneliness and out-of-placeness, where I learned and loved to read and found in literature the wild connections, understanding, and a chorus of voices which spoke to me then across time, space, culture and language, and encouraged and emboldened me, and continue to do so until today.

Risks and Revelations

Goddard MFAW faculty Victoria Nelson: The whole thing about risks is that you don’t know whether the risk is a good one or a bad one until after you take the plunge. That’s why it’s a risk.

Prophetic Writing

Goddard MFAW faculty John McManus: The attorney general, having sought and won the presidency, set out to dismantle the government. He dissolved the White House Press Corps. He prank-called other world leaders, hanging up on them or threatening war. He trusted no one but his beloved daughter. He commanded the Joint Chiefs of Staff to declare DEFCON 1, just for the sake of the adrenaline rush it gave him.

Writers Resist: Write Now!

Goddard MFAW faculty Kyle Bass: Write the book you need to read. Right now. Write now.

Interview with Bhanu Kapil

Goddard MFAW faculty Bhanu Kapil is interviewed about her life as a poet in the most recent Cosmonauts Avenue!

Hope is a Form of Energy

Goddard MFAW faculty Michael Klein: The beautiful writer, John Berger, who died a day into the New Year once said to the living: “hope is not a form of guarantee; it’s a form of energy, and very frequently that energy is strongest in circumstances that are very dark.” For all of you, I wish radical hope.

Resisting Silence

As the CNN election night coverage began, I was calm. Before the culminating night of the 2016 presidential campaign, I had believed that only in fiction Donald Trump could be elected president. However, while I was in the classroom, teaching my students about writing in scenes, the fiction was happening.

The CLOCKHOUSE Folio

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Dear Young Disabled Writer and Disabled Writers Not Yet Born,

Goddard MFAW faculty Kenny Fries: Dear Young Disabled Writer and Disabled Writers Not Yet Born,

You might ask: What does this have to do with the disturbing results of the recent U.S. election? Why is this story important for me to impart to you at this time?

When I was born in 1960 nobody knew whether I would live or die. When, after four weeks in an incubator, my parents were able to take me home, nobody knew whether I’d be able to walk.

Now, here I am fifty-six years later, alive and, most of the time, still walking.

Ni’Ja Whitson’s A Meditation on Tongues

Goddard MFAW student, choreographer Ni’Ja Whitson’s “A Meditation on Tongues” is a live adaptation of “Tongues Untied,” Marlon Riggs’s 1989 documentary about gay black men amid the AIDS crisis. An interdisciplinary piece about black and queer masculinity, this production, at the Abrons Arts Center, is a world premiere. (American Realness, Saturday through Monday)

Kirsten Childs: Underneath It All

Goddard MFAW faculty Deborah Brevoort gave her Fall 2016 advising group the extraordinary opportunity to connect with the prolific writer, Kirsten Childs. Her credentials span various works, but we had the pleasure of examining her musical, The Bubbly Black Girl Sheds Her Chameleon Skin. This is a funny and poignant story about a little black girl named Viveca Stanton and her journey of self-discovery.

Note on the Last Day

Goddard MFAW faculty Bhanu Kapil: It’s the last day: December 31, 2016. The year of shit and magic has, in other words, almost come to an end.

CLOCKHOUSE Volume Four

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Back to the Future of Theatre

Goddard College MFAW faculty Deb Brevoort: When I asked my friends why they wanted to cancel our season tickets (or not go to the theatre at all) they gave me a variety of answers. Here are some of the things they’ve said: The plays didn’t “grab them.” The shows were “boring.” They “wanted to feel moved, but didn’t.” One friend complained that the plays we were seeing didn’t have an “aha” moment;” another said that they wanted “something more;” another said “where’s the take-way?” Many of them said that they wanted to be “left with something,” and the plays we were attending didn’t leave them with anything.

America Isn’t (and Wasn’t) Great. What Now?

Jan Clausen, Goddard MFAW faculty: Using the hashtag #writersresist, a group founded by poet Erin Belieu of VIDA has called for writers to come together and defend “[the] most basic principles of freedom and justice for all.”

Writ in Air

Goddard MFAW Faculty Keenan Norris: While life still goes on as unpredictably as ever, the sabbatical itself is proving to be the perfect vehicle for productivity. It’s the safest means of going off the grid that I think exists outside of utilizing all that trust fund money I don’t have and selling my majority share in that wildly successful company of mine that doesn’t exist. In all seriousness, I feel really privileged to have this time away from teaching to write, to read, to explore some new creative directions for my work and to assess and re-develop my teaching strategies.

What Happens When Nothing Happens

Goddard College MFAW alumna Christine Kalafus: What happens when nothing happens has this practical, grown-up writer falling prey to childlike superstition. My jeans fit today with no evidence of muffin-top so clearly I will win Big Essay Contest! or My mother has called three times and I haven’t called her back; obviously Prominent Literary Magazines will say no. If my grown-up bargaining isn’t exactly like what I experienced as a kid, it feels unnervingly close. I am reminded that, whenever I wait for a subjective response, I’m in danger of handing someone else my self-esteem.

Election Anxiety

Goddard MFAW faculty Susan Kim: I saw a cartoon on Facebook last week of Bart Simpson by his usual blackboard. Only this time, he has written “I will not compulsively check FiveThirtyEight.com” over and over.

The New American Story Project

Goddard MFA in Creative Writing faculty member Micheline Aharonian Marcom, along with four other artists and writers, for the past year and a half has been working on The New American Story Project, a digital oral history project recording the stories of children who have fled violence in Central America and have come to the United States as refugees. JoAnne Tompkins, a current student in the Goddard MFA in Writing Program in Port Townsend, WA, interviews Aharonian Marcom about The New American Story Project.

The Seep, October 8-20, 2016

Goddard MFAW faculty Beatrix Gates: There’s a drought here in Maine, and lately I’ve been studying a seep in the backfield. A seep is a moist or wet place where water, usually groundwater, reaches the earth’s surface from an underground aquifer and pools in a depression. A seep will be found quickly by wildlife and bring new birds and animals to the area. There is every sign that’s true.

Locker Room Talk

Goddard MFAW alumna Julie Parent: “It’s locker room talk, and it’s one of those things.”

In response to events in the presidential campaign over that last 10 days, I’ve tried several times to write something resembling a cohesive thought pattern. Instead, I’ve remained anxious and rattled by the reality that one of the main candidates for President of the United States is on tape bragging about committing sexual assault, who later dismisses his remarks as something he’s not proud of but with the implication that they are somehow normal, even expected.

White Girl Migration

After graduate school, I joined a migration of writers to New York. My homeland was Skokie, a suburb outside Chicago, where our mostly old neighbors had just survived the holocaust and I could walk all by myself to their houses to play cards with them. We lived in identical small ranch houses, mine distinguished by being a place where adults spelled out the word “divorce” over my head like profanity and always in relation to other people. There was dinner every night, breakfast every morning, cocktails and television, piano lessons, BBQs on the patio, a set of World Book Encyclopedias and 12 novels, one of which was Gore Vidal’s MYRA BRECKINRIDGE, which I read on the sly when I was 12.

Oscar Wilde’s Wild Letter

GoddardMFAW faculty member Victoria Nelson on Oscar Wilde: Unbidden, a voice rose inside me: Oscar, get over it… How honest are we writers when we deliver our version of a real-life story in our memoirs and autobiographical fiction? Do we tell the hard truth about ourselves as well as the other guy? Or do we, every now and then, use our art to justify ourselves and settle scores–we poor victims with better words?

Save the Dates!

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Once upon a time… in Connecticut

Goddard MFAW faculty Aimee Liu: Once upon a time, the story begins… and instantly we are transported. Those four simple words cast a spell around the world, with translations in virtually every language promising a journey to a “time” that is also a place, like a magic carpet or hidden castle that we “once” might have come “upon” in another life.

Catching the First Fish

Dillard writes, “How do you catch the first fish?” The woman cuts a strip of flesh from her own thigh to catch the first fish and so we the writers must start with ourselves.

On H.G. Wells

Goddard MFAW faculty John McManus: I’m thinking this morning of Herbert George Wells, the science-fiction writer and prophetic humanist born 150 years ago this week.

Child’s Play

Kyle Bass, Goddard MFAW faculty: Like the tikes who showed up again and again in my stories, I preferred the company and troubles of adults. It appears my child-self fits a psychological profile for what I’ve become.

Book People

Goddard MFAW faculty Michael Klein: Apparently, E.L. Doctorow once taught a course that only had one book on the syllabus. The class read the one book and decided from there what the next book should be. If it was Jane Eyre, somebody might then suggest The Wide Sargasso Sea, which was a prequel and written by another writer at a completely different time. Perhaps, reading both books would give a person a rounder sense of the world created by both sets of characters.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the F-Bomb:  A Young Adult Author vs. the Four-Letter Word

Goddard College MFAW faculty Sherri L. Smith on using the F-Bomb: If Sales is saying it, not changing the line could mean no sales! I could single-handedly obliterate the success of my book by dropping an f-bomb!!!

Bhanu Kapil’s Goddard College MFAW Commencement Speech

From Goddard College MFAW faculty member Bhanu Kapil:

Dear writers.

Dear graduates.

I would like to close today with a blessing upon your lives, and the writing to come; your own passage as writers in the world:

From the love that was given to me in my family, whether I knew it or not at the time.

From the desire to speak and write in a radical English, the English of a country that is not mine.

Dear writers.

I give you the number 76. I encourage you not to give up until you’ve tried something 76 times, whether that’s applying for a job, revising a draft or sending it out. I encourage you to write with endurance and abandon.

And I hope that you fail.

I hope that you fail in such a way that you start to shine, as brightly as you did when you first began.

Elvis, Noh, and Patience

Goddard College MFAW faculty member Deborah Brevoort: Tonight I will finally get to see a production of my MFA thesis play, a Noh drama about Elvis Presley titled Blue Moon Over Memphis. I have waited 23 years for this day.

The Cathedral and the Yurt

Goddard College MFAW-VT faculty member Jan Clausen: “I get it. I keep trying to build cathedrals when I should be building yurts.” This comment from an advisee, about her struggle to get annotations down to more manageable dimensions, has stuck with me for years as a witty image for one of the perennial dilemmas of critical writing.

Laughs (Or Lack Of…)

Goddard MFAW faculty member Rogelio Martinez on writing comedy: “I place laughs in a play to carefully track the play’s relationship with the audience. If a laugh fails to land then there may be several reasons why. It may be the acting or the directing, but usually it’s the writing. It has little to do with the laugh itself but with those things surrounding the laugh – plot, characters, obstacles, etc. In other words, it’s not whether the joke is funny or not but whether the audience has been paying attention to the play.”

Body Language

Goddard MFA Faculty member Susan Kim writes, “When I discovered that the residency theme was “Body, Language” and that I was expected to deliver a keynote, I grew despondent. Maybe what I really was, was overwhelmed. Because let’s face it: anything with “body” in it is one hefty mother of a subject. Writing outside of the body is difficult…and risky. We risk getting it wrong. We risk looking really stupid. And we certainly risk offending, often the same readers we are trying to reach.

Cynthia Bond Reads at Goddard–Port Townsend

Goddard College presents a reading by New York Times bestselling author Cynthia Bond on Wednesday, July 20th, at 7 PM at 204 Battery Way in Fort Worden State Park. Bond will read from her critically acclaimed novel Ruby, an Oprah book club selection.

Who Are You and What Are You Hiding?

“When I walk down the street in jeans and a T-shirt, I’m hiding. When I wear these costumes, I am being honest about who I am.”

Congratulations to the Newest MFAW Alumni!

Clockhouse Writers’ Conference

Wit’s End

Goddard MFA alumna Katrina Barnes asks, “At what point is a person at their wit’s end? And how does one reach this destination?”

For Orlando: Make Beautiful in Maine

I knew—gay club–when I heard it on the radio. Florida: old mistress to the Right, corrupt, stolen-election, multi-lingual, and one of the gay capitols. All at once.

The Limits of the World

Goddard MFA Faculty member Micheline Marcom recalls what Schopenhauer said: “Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world.” She wonders how we might, in our “Information Age,” see better.

Why Self-Publish–Bring That Book Into the Light

Self-publish? Mon Dieu! and Sacre bleu! Never! After all, we students in Goddard’s MFA Creative Writing program aim to hone our writing to such an elegant point that we assume agents and publishers will beat down our doors, right?

Literary Life Tests

Goddard MFA Faculty member Victoria Nelson talks about literary life tests: the ones you face out there in the world after you graduate. “Pay attention to the outside cues…”

The Tomorrow That is Your Life

The same tomorrow you have thought about these last days and months and that you may be thinking about right now.

The tomorrow that is your life.

Looking for Normal

Because of my own struggles with writing my play, I was relieved to find out that constructing Looking for Normal had not been an easy task for her. She said it began as a comedy sketch but, after some maturity and many drafts, it turned into something much deeper.

Seneca, Politkovskaya, and the Endangered Magic of Literature

I had the honor of meeting Anna Politkovskaya, the Russian journalist who wrote passionately and beautifully on behalf of both civilians and soldiers caught up in the brutality of the war in Chechnya. In 2002 PEN honored Anna here in LA. Almost exactly four years later she was murdered in her Moscow apartment building. She was 48 years old.

A Short Story Story

Goddard MFA Faculty member John McManus writes, “I’m trying to resist the temptation to take the novel I’m close to completing after fifteen years, cut 325 of its 350 pages, and turn it into a short story.”

Once Upon Three Apples, or Notes on How to Measure a Story

Goddard MFA Faculty member Kyle Bass writes, “Dare to ask Edward Albee what the new play he’s writing is about and he will say, “It’s about 90 minutes.” While his prickly pithiness is a means by which to protect the sanctity of his process, Albee’s at-the-ready, stiletto reply cuts to an important truth about art and dimension: a short painting? A full-length poem? Of course not. A thing is complete in its own completeness.”

Top 25 Take-Aways From AWP 2016, In Order of Occurrence

Goddard MFA student Sarah Ratermann Beahan went to AWP with a mission to learn what the hundreds of experts, the writers that had acquired some success, had to say about the rules of writing.

Motti Lerner Lecture, Part Two

Part Two of Motti Lerner’s Lecture at Strasbourg University, edited by Goddard MFA student Patricia Connelly. Motti Lerner examines the devastating personal and professional cost to an artist — an internationally known Israeli concert pianist — for speaking out against the war in Israel.

“As I write these words”: An Experiment in Recursion*

Goddard MFA Faculty member Bhanu Kapil offers an experiment in recursion: “I’m descending as I write these words. I’m flying above the Pacific Ocean as I write these words, refusing to do it, to read or to write…”

Wondering What to Expect at CWC&R?

Registration is still open for the 2016 Clockhouse Writers’ Conference & Retreat. Wondering what to expect from the Goddard MFA alumni conference if you decide to attend? Read on!

Motti Lerner: The Whole is Greater Than the Sum of its Parts

Goddard MFA student Patricia Connelly shares a talk given by Motti Lerner, a preeminent Israeli playwright, screenwriter and television writer, whose play, The Admission, ignited a firestorm in Washington when it was announced as part of the season at Theater J.

Failure is a Tool for Making Progress

Success could only be achieved after every possible mistake had been made on the ground, in order that they would not occur in the air. The engineers coined an expression about this that became their motto: Failure is a tool for making progress.

Was My Life Worth Typing?

“Was My Life Worth Living?” is the wonderful title of an essay by the American anarchist Emma Goldman. I’ve always loved her blunt phrasing of the ultimate question behind the writing of personal narrative. Recently I’ve been faced with my own version of her conundrum, as I’ve been immersed in the text of my memoir Apples and Oranges…

AWP, Disability, and Buffalo Steel

This year, out of thousands of proposals for panels and presentations, the AWP chose not one disability-related panel. Imagine, for a moment, the AWP had chosen no panels by people of color. None by women. None by LGBT people. There would be an uproar. That uproar, except within the still fairly insular disability writing community, did not happen.

The Art of Loving Poetry

I had no idea how to start a press but my fingers searched for the path and I began to feel my way in the dark, researching different options and learning as I went along while fueled by the love of writing poetry and the love of sharing poetry that I loved.

The Backup Plan

Next year Duke will once again be in contention for the national championship, you will be in contention for a special place in some theater’s season, and some poor soul in high school will be hoping to be more than just someone’s backup plan.

And have you read… The Glass Jar? Poet’s Resume (An excerpt)

LANGUAGE SPOKEN

Port, starboard, forward, aft, bow, stern, fo’c’sle, lazarette, half hitch, clove hitch, bowline, lovers knot, freeboard, false deck, fairlead, deck-winch, vanging-winch, picking boom, power block, davit, dump-box, buoy stick, PTO, chiller, seacock, shaft, rudder, keel, magnetic north, true north, degrees of variation, aurora borealis, bio luminescence, Morning Star.

Tricking My Brain

Goddard MFA Faculty member Nicola Morris tells us: “I’ve learned to cultivate these moments. I’ve accumulated tricks to divert my plodding self. The message? Accumulate tricks. Steal other people’s tricks. And have fun.”

And have you read…Fire Sale? (an excerpt)

Goddard MFA alumna Brianna Johnson’s thesis, Fire Sale, was recently published as a digital chapbook with Essay Press. Here’s how it begins: “I come from whiteness, which is not innocent. If I speak of things which cause intense pain, it is because I have felt pain because of them. Not feeling would cause greater pain to the memory of those brutalized. I don’t condone evil, but I acknowledge it. I am here to acknowledge it.”

On Writing

I published my first stories while an undergrad. I learned the difference between ego and real confidence in my writing and ultimately I learned how to stand by my work even as I reimagined it, recreated it.

How Poetry Means

MFA Faculty member Jane Wohl talks about the light, shadows and feeling of poetry in this video from Saturday University, along with an immigration lawyer speaking on immigration law and how it affects Wyoming, and a biologist discussing polar bears and climate change.

AWP Alumni & Faculty Reception

On Thursday, March 31st, 6:30-8:00 pm, Goddard College is hosting an Alumni and Faculty Reception at the AWP conference for both the MFAW and BFAW programs in the JW Mariott Hotel’s Diamond Salon 8. Join us! Reconnect with your community, bring your friends!

And have you read… Collateral?

The Writer caught up with Goddard MFA alum Simone John for an interview about Collateral, her newly published first book of poetry!

The Art of Being Overwhelmed

New MFA faculty member Sherri L. Smith talks about how to make writing a priority. “We writers are a shaky bunch, never happy when we aren’t writing, never sure if we are happy even when we are elbow deep in the work. But we need it. We cannot always be in the world without distilling it, and if we don’t put it on the page, it ferments and poisons us.”

And have you read… A Tale for the Time Being?

Goddard MFA faculty member Rahna Reiko Rizzuto (author of two books including the memoirHiroshima in the Morning) has been waiting for a decade for Ruth’s next book and is thrilled to be able to interview her about her just-released novel, A Tale for the Time Being. Here, Ruth talks about being a writer (and a thinker) in the world first, and how that writer and her preoccupations end up on the page.

And have you read… Guardians?

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Contested Spaces

Kenny Fries, Goddard MFA faculty member living in Berlin, visits “Homosexualität_en” exhibit at the Deutsches Historisches Museum and the Schwules Museum: “I was reminded of how the word “homosexual” was used for the first time around the same time as the word “normal,” and how historically the issue of “cure” has pertained to both homosexuality and disability. I noted how there have been laws “outlawing” both homosexuality and disability, including the “ugly” laws in the United States, which made it illegal for disabled people to appear in public. Most of these laws were not repealed until the 1970s. Chicago’s 1911 ordinance that stated, “It is hereby prohibited for any person who is diseased, maimed, mutilated, or deformed in any way so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object to expose himself to public view,” was the last to be repealed, in 1974.”

Are We Not Everyone? The Writer as Siddhartha

Goddard MFAW faculty member Darrah Cloud confesses to reading Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha, for the 11th time. “Last night, on the 71st anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, I put it down and binge-watched a television show on HBO called Master of None…”

And have you read… Lay Down Your Weary Tune?

W.B (Bill) Belcher’s (Goddard MFAW ’07) debut novel, Lay Down Your Weary Tune, which he began at Goddard, was released on January 26th from Other Press.

Poetry & Masks Collaboration: Beatrix Gates

Poetry and masks at the Farm/Arts Exchange in Down East Maine’s Hancock County with Goddard MFAW faculty member Bea Gates and her old friend Ron King–farmer, weaver, queer activist (Stonewall to present day), social worker, and wearer of masks–on Faerie Kingdom Road, King Hill Farm, Penobscot.

A Long Weekend of Good Work: Offerings at the First Annual Lighthouse Writers’ Conference & Retreat

New writers’ conference created by Goddard MFAW alumni in Port Townsend is launching next month. An exciting four days of programming is in the works right now. Join us!

And have you read… The Walking?

The Walking, Goddard MFAW faculty member Laleh Khadivi’s historical novel, began as a meditation on migration, all kinds of migration, bird, whale, antelope, fish and human… The Writer asked her how she got started.

What Keeps You Up At Night?

What comes to you when you think of Goddard? At the Goddard MFAW graduation in Vermont, graduate Laura Cyphers mused about “radical imagination” means. And we ask you: What does it require of us to be a writer in the world? If we said to you, “Write for the World,” would that imply a social consciousness, a personal urgency, or an exhortation (along with the skills you will need) to reach the greatest audience possible?

New Convergence

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A Happy New Year to All!

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And more on… Fox Tooth Heart

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And have you read… Green?

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And have you read… Flash House?

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My First Time

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Counting Pleasures

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Futurists, Debate!

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Sustainable Scholarship

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In medias res

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What Would Sappho Do?

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To Literature

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And have you read… Erebus?

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In the Middle of Things

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On Collaboration

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New story. News story.

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Coming Full Circle

I took a class in Japanese Theatre and found myself drawn to the Noh because it was so different from anything I had ever seen. Noh dramas are based on stories that are well known to the audience and they lack most of the dramatic conventions we expect in a play in the west, such as plot, action, or character development.

And have you read… Gaining?

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Small Dialogs

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In Some Darker Place

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Limboland

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How to Rewrite

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february

16feb7:00 pm8:30 pmFeaturedSarah Townsend Reading

Event Details

Debut memoirist Sarah Townsend will be returning to Goddard College as our Visiting Alumna.  She will read and answer questions about her book Setting the Wire: A Memoir of Postpartum Psychosis (The Lettered Streets Press, 2019). This public event will take place at 7pm in the Reading Room on the second floor of Building 204, 200 Battery Way, in Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, WA 98368. A reception and book signing will immediately follow the reading.

Please join us for this public reading and celebration!

Bestselling author Claire Dederer described Setting the Wire as “a tightly coiled and disturbingly gorgeous exploration of her postpartum mental breakdown. I devoured these pages–while willing myself to slow down so I could catch every nuance of Townsend’s taut, lyrical, wise writing.”

Sarah Townsend received her MFA from Goddard College, and her MA in counseling psychology from Northwestern University. Setting the Wire has been featured on Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton, The Ish with Cameron Dezen Hammon, UpFront with Cat Brooks of KPFA (NPR) in Berkeley, and in the Chicago Review of Books. Sarah currently teaches at Hugo House in Seattle, WA. She also serves on the advisory committee of Perinatal Support Washington and on the Postpartum Psychosis Task Force of Postpartum Support International. She co-facilitates the Holyoke Reading Series and the Goddard College Alumni Lighthouse Writers’ Conference & Retreat.

Time

(Sunday) 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Location

Goddard College Fort Worden Campus

Fort Worden

19feb7:00 pm8:30 pmFeaturedAward-winning Author Nisi Shawl to Speak at Goddard MFAW Port Townsend Residency

Event Details

Critically acclaimed author Nisi Shawl will be speaking at Goddard College’s MFA in Creative Writing Program on Wednesday, February 19, 2020.  They will read and answer questions about their work, which includes the steampunk novel Everfair –an alternate and happier history of the so-called Belgian Congo. This public event will take place at 7pm in the Reading Room on the second floor of Building 204, 200 Battery Way, in Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, WA 98368. A reception and book signing will immediately follow the reading.

Nisi Shawl also wrote the James Tiptree, Jr. Award-winning story collection Filter House (2008). Other recent titles include the collections Talk Like a Man (2019) and A Primer on Nisi Shawl (2018). They co-wrote Writing the Other: A Practical Approach (2005), a standard text on inclusive representation in the imaginative genres and the basis for many of their online and in-person workshops.  They co-edited the anthologies Stories for Chip: A Tribute to Samuel R. Delany; and Strange Matings: Science Fiction, Feminism, African American Voices, and Octavia E. Butler.  In 2019 Solaris published their latest editing venture, the acclaimed anthology New Suns: Original Speculative Fiction by People of Color.

Shawl has spoken at Duke University, Spelman College, University of Hawai’i Manoa, Smith College, and several other educational institutions, and has taught at University of Washington Bothell and at Sarah Lawrence College.  They regularly contribute book reviews and criticism to The Seattle Times, Ms. Magazine, Los Angeles Review of Books, Seattle Review of Books, and The Washington Post.  They also edit book reviews for the feminist journal Cascadia Subduction Zone.  Shawl is a Carl Brandon Society founder and a Clarion West board member.  They live in Seattle near an enticingly large lake filled with dangerous currents.

Time

(Wednesday) 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Location

Goddard College Fort Worden Campus

Fort Worden

26feb5:30 pm7:00 pmZOOM into the Goddard MFA! Join Our February Info Session.Meet Goddard College MFA in Creating Writing's program director Elena Georgiou and learn how our low-residency MFA program can help you develop your voice as a writer in the world.

Event Details

Want to find out more about the Goddard low residency MFA in Creative Writing? On FEBRUARY 26th, join our next virtual Zoom meeting with Director Elena Georgiou and discover why the first low residency MFA program in the country is still thriving and may be the best for you!
GODDARD HONORS YOUR VOICE, YOUR VISION, YOUR GOALS AND YOUR LIFE.  OUR AWARD-WINNING FACULTY IS HERE TO HELP YOU DEVELOP THE SKILLS YOU NEED TO CREATE THE PROJECT YOU CAME TO WRITE. OUR RESIDENCIES GIVE YOU THE FREEDOM TO EXPERIMENT OR DIVE DEEPLY INTO YOUR GENRE.  NO LECTURES, NO REQUIRED TRACKS, NO ONE ELSE’S CANON.
Goddard’s model is ideal for people with commitments to family or work who choose to hone their writing skills at the same time. The Goddard MFA program enables you to tailor your study to any of a wide variety of genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, graphic novel, and hybrid forms, and to learn from a diverse faculty of published authors. Goddard also offers playwriting, screenwriting, TV writing, and libretto writing from our Vermont campus, through one-on-one mentorship from working writers in the TV, theatre, film, and opera fields.
Goddard’s program takes place on two coasts: Port Townsend, WA in February and July, and Plainfield, VT in January and July.
Our next call is on February 26  2020 5:30-7:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) 
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/vJ0scuiurDkjPzFxMPRzHhQDjS7UZNX0Lw
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Time

(Wednesday) 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm EST

Location

Virtual

Organizer

Goddard College Admissionsdaphne.kinney-landis@goddard.edu

march

19mar6:30 pm8:00 pmZOOM into the Goddard MFA! Join Our March Info Session.Meet Goddard College MFA in Creating Writing's program director Elena Georgiou and learn how our low-residency MFA program can help you develop your voice as a writer in the world.

Event Details

Want to find out more about the Goddard low residency MFA in Creative Writing? On MARCH 19th, join our next virtual Zoom meeting with Director Elena Georgiou and discover why the first low residency MFA program in the country is still thriving and may be the best for you!
GODDARD HONORS YOUR VOICE, YOUR VISION, YOUR GOALS AND YOUR LIFE.  OUR AWARD-WINNING FACULTY IS HERE TO HELP YOU DEVELOP THE SKILLS YOU NEED TO CREATE THE PROJECT YOU CAME TO WRITE. OUR RESIDENCIES GIVE YOU THE FREEDOM TO EXPERIMENT OR DIVE DEEPLY INTO YOUR GENRE.  NO LECTURES, NO REQUIRED TRACKS, NO ONE ELSE’S CANON.
Goddard’s model is ideal for people with commitments to family or work who choose to hone their writing skills at the same time. The Goddard MFA program enables you to tailor your study to any of a wide variety of genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, graphic novel, and hybrid forms, and to learn from a diverse faculty of published authors. Goddard also offers playwriting, screenwriting, TV writing, and libretto writing from our Vermont campus, through one-on-one mentorship from working writers in the TV, theatre, film, and opera fields.
Goddard’s program takes place on two coasts: Port Townsend, WA in February and July, and Plainfield, VT in January and July.
Our next Zoom meeting is on March 19, 2020 6:30-8:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) 
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/uJwtcumhrzwjjCG7HSs5fSvD74SlLLqmJA
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
For more information, contact Daphne Kinney-Landis, Associate Director of Admissions, at Daphne.kinney-landis@goddard.edu.
Request information  or  APPLY NOW

Time

(Thursday) 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm EST

Location

Virtual

Organizer

Goddard College Admissionsdaphne.kinney-landis@goddard.edu

april

11apr2:00 pm3:30 pmZOOM into the Goddard MFA! First of two April Info Sessions.Meet Goddard College MFA in Creating Writing's program director Elena Georgiou and learn how our low-residency MFA program can help you develop your voice as a writer in the world.

Event Details

Want to find out more about the Goddard low residency MFA in Creative Writing? On APRIL 11th, join our next virtual Zoom meeting with Director Elena Georgiou and discover why the first low residency MFA program in the country is still thriving and may be the best for you!
GODDARD HONORS YOUR VOICE, YOUR VISION, YOUR GOALS AND YOUR LIFE.  OUR AWARD-WINNING FACULTY IS HERE TO HELP YOU DEVELOP THE SKILLS YOU NEED TO CREATE THE PROJECT YOU CAME TO WRITE. OUR RESIDENCIES GIVE YOU THE FREEDOM TO EXPERIMENT OR DIVE DEEPLY INTO YOUR GENRE.  NO LECTURES, NO REQUIRED TRACKS, NO ONE ELSE’S CANON.
Goddard’s model is ideal for people with commitments to family or work who choose to hone their writing skills at the same time. The Goddard MFA program enables you to tailor your study to any of a wide variety of genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, graphic novel, and hybrid forms, and to learn from a diverse faculty of published authors. Goddard also offers playwriting, screenwriting, TV writing, and libretto writing from our Vermont campus, through one-on-one mentorship from working writers in the TV, theatre, film, and opera fields.

Goddard’s program takes place on two coasts: Port Townsend, WA in February and July, and Plainfield, VT in January and July.

Our next Zoom meeting is on April 11, 2020 2:00-3:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) 
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/v5cpc-yrqzovAQ6y9LqVhTjdGnGEFPY4WA 
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

For more information, contact Daphne Kinney-Landis, Associate Director of Admissions, at Daphne.kinney-landis@goddard.edu.

Request information  or  APPLY NOW

Time

(Saturday) 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm EST

Location

Virtual

Organizer

Goddard College Admissionsdaphne.kinney-landis@goddard.edu

30apr7:00 pm8:30 pmZOOM into the Goddard MFA! Second April Info Session.Meet Goddard College MFA in Creating Writing's program director Elena Georgiou and learn how our low-residency MFA program can help you develop your voice as a writer in the world.

Event Details

Want to find out more about the Goddard low residency MFA in Creative Writing? On APRIL 30th, join our next virtual Zoom meeting with Director Elena Georgiou and discover why the first low residency MFA program in the country is still thriving and may be the best for you!
GODDARD HONORS YOUR VOICE, YOUR VISION, YOUR GOALS AND YOUR LIFE.  OUR AWARD-WINNING FACULTY IS HERE TO HELP YOU DEVELOP THE SKILLS YOU NEED TO CREATE THE PROJECT YOU CAME TO WRITE. OUR RESIDENCIES GIVE YOU THE FREEDOM TO EXPERIMENT OR DIVE DEEPLY INTO YOUR GENRE.  NO LECTURES, NO REQUIRED TRACKS, NO ONE ELSE’S CANON.
Goddard’s model is ideal for people with commitments to family or work who choose to hone their writing skills at the same time. The Goddard MFA program enables you to tailor your study to any of a wide variety of genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, graphic novel, and hybrid forms, and to learn from a diverse faculty of published authors. Goddard also offers playwriting, screenwriting, TV writing, and libretto writing from our Vermont campus, through one-on-one mentorship from working writers in the TV, theatre, film, and opera fields.

Goddard’s program takes place on two coasts: Port Townsend, WA in February and July, and Plainfield, VT in January and July.

Our next Zoom meeting is on April 30, 2020 7:00-8:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) 
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/v5cpc-yrqzovAQ6y9LqVhTjdGnGEFPY4WA 
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

For more information, contact Daphne Kinney-Landis, Associate Director of Admissions, at Daphne.kinney-landis@goddard.edu.

Request information  or  APPLY NOW

Time

(Thursday) 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm EST

Location

Virtual

Organizer

Goddard College Admissionsdaphne.kinney-landis@goddard.edu

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