Doing Laundry with Hannibal Lecter

Doing Laundry with Hannibal Lecter

Do you suppose Hannibal Lecter does his own laundry?  It’s easy to see a white collar criminal doctor sending his whites out to be dry cleaned and pressed by an efficiently outsourced place with pink boxes.  But I imagine, what with the blood stains and all, doing it himself is a better plan.  So there he is in the basement—or, I guess he has one of those fancy laundry rooms on an upper floor with sunny yellow walls and a sign that says “Wash. Dry. Fold. Repeat.”— sorting whites and red and pulling out the bleach and hoping it doesn’t ruin his favorite sweater… 

Disability Representation in Literature:  Beyond “The Fries Test”

Disability Representation in Literature:  Beyond “The Fries Test”

As a disabled writer, for over two decades I’ve looked at how disability is represented in our literature. This interest has taken me across the globe, with a special focus in disability representation in Japan, and more recently in Germany. I’ve taught classes and given talks on disability representation at many universities and conferences in North America, Japan, and Europe.

Dear Books,

Dear Books,

Dear Books,

From the moment my father gave me Go Tell It on the Mountain and told me,

“Read this and you’ll know more about who I am,” 

I knew one thing was inescapable: 

I would need to read that book, get back to him about it, and keep on reading and reading—

Toiling in the Labyrinth: On Reading Literature Critically

Toiling in the Labyrinth: On Reading Literature Critically

My purpose for reading literature critically rests on two sloping planes. On the first plane is pleasure—experiencing the epiphany of understanding, a resolution to my inquiring mind. In other words, the Aha! moment. It’s the immediate gratification of critical thinking, which may be a purpose in of itself. However, beneath that first pleasurable plane, for me, is the second, more self-reflective plane.

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